Myth #1: Superfoods are exotic and expensive

Local, everyday foods are superfoods, too—and are far less expensive! Eating a diet that’s high in processed foods but then adding in some goji berries and spirulina doesn’t mean you have a healthy diet. That’s like going to McDonalds for a super sized Big Mac meal and adding a diet coke to save the calories. You’ll save money and be much healthier if you focus on eating more whole foods and “everyday superfoods” like spinach, mushrooms, squash, blueberries, oranges and apples, lentils, whole grains and nuts. These familiar foods are packed with antioxidants and fiber and won’t blow your budget like that small bag of acai powder will.

Myth #2: Being slim means you’re healthy

This myth is a tough one to let go of, because our society is so focused on body size. Everywhere we look, society seems to tell us that being slender is more desirable. The good news is that as CrossFitters we know that strong is healthy. Research suggests that overweight people who are active can be healthier and live longer than slimmer people who don’t exercise. We all have different body types, and it’s about time we stopped focusing on size and shifted our focus on developing healthier habits.

Myth #3: You should avoid all sugar—even fruit

Sugar-free diets are all the rage right now, but there’s a difference between sugar found in whole foods such as fruit and vegetables and the refined sugar found in processed foods. Those whole foods naturally come with fiber to help slow down your body’s absorption of their natural sugars.“The 2015 Dietary Guidelines explicitly calls for limiting added sugars, the type of sweeteners found in cookies, cake, candy, and sweet beverages, to 10% of your daily calories or less,” explains Elizabeth Ward, MS, RD, of Better Is The New Perfect. “That recommendation doesn’t include naturally sweet foods, which are sources of important vitamins, minerals, and phytonutrients.”

Myth #4: You need to ban carbs to lose weight

Switching out refined grains like white bread for carbs that provide slow-burning energy like steel cut oats, sweet potatoes, and quinoa is a healthy move, but banning all carbs for your diet just isn’t necessary. At worst, it could lead to more carb cravings and weight regain once you go off your low-carb plan.

Myth #5: The diet that works for models and celebrities will work for you

So your favorite CrossFitter eats nothing but donuts and ice cream while training 8 hours a day according to their Instagram feed. Does that mean you should try the same thing and expect to get the same results? Of course not. Thinking that celebrity diets will work for you is a huge myth and thinking that 100% of what you see on social media is true is also a bad idea. Get your nutrition and diet advice from people who are experts, not social media.

If you’re interested in learning how we can help you make a real change to your nutrition, let us know!

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